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Mattias Jersild designed by BVD

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Logo and business card with an Indigo type-only design solution for Swedish copywriter Mattias Jersild created by BVD

Of all BVD’s recent projects, which includes their packaging for 7-Eleven – a blog favourite this and last week -, it is their work for Swedish copywriter Mattias Jersild that really stood out for me. It is an incredibly simple but wonderfully laid out, spaced and restrained solution that introduces variety through an interesting mix of lowercase, sentence case and uppercase typography set out as paragraphs and footnotes using the Swedish typeface Indigo. A choice that, by drawing on classic 15th and 16th century literary references, digitally adapting these to fit contemporary printing techniques and giving ‘optimal legibility to ordinary type sizes’ – works well to convey a sense of timelessness, professionalism and academia.

There is an honesty and straightforwardness in the uncoated nature of the paper, the single black ink print treatment and the way the logo-type sits unassumingly within the body of the content – marked only by a change to and motion of an italic – which feels complimentary rather than appearing overtly individual. The absence of iconic or superfluous detail clearly places language at the very heart of the identity with a modernistic design sophistication and although I cannot read Swedish I have no doubt that there is a personal relevance to every word.

Business card with an Indigo type-only design solution for Swedish copywriter Mattias Jersild created by BVD

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Logo and business card with an Indigo type-only design solution for Swedish copywriter Mattias Jersild created by BVD

Logo and business card with an Indigo type-only design solution for Swedish copywriter Mattias Jersild created by BVD

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  • http://www.logicandmagicinc.com Shaughn McGurk

    I admire their restraint and the attention to typographic detail. Complementing this with a simple, white uncoated stock is, for me at least, like taking a lungful of fresh Swedish air – cold, tinged with the scent of snow and pine. It makes me feel better for having breathed it in.

    Using an absence of image to represent a copywriter is not new – check out a writing agency called “The Writer” to see how a simple gadzook ligature can transform a piece of type into a deft logo – but this still delivers a rare simplicity and is all the better for it.

    I can’t read Swedish either. I hope the content lives up to the execution.

    Happy New Year Richard. I’m looking forward to what you deliver to my inbox. Thanks for keeping us all plugged in, inspired and motivated.

    • http://bpando.wordpress.com Richard Baird

      Hay Shaun good to hear from you and Happy New Year!

      Sure I can appreciate that this isn’t a new concept and suppose it’s quite an obvious root but think it’s been handled incredibly well, I’ve seen some attempts in the past that just don’t seem so confidently resolved, often a detail, print finish or material choice too far. I’ll definitely take a look at ‘The Writer’, in fact I’ll do it right now. Thanks!

    • http://bpando.wordpress.com Richard Baird

      Is it this one? Good example of unnecessary ligature detail.

      • shaughnmcgurk

        That’s the one. Personally, I like the ligature, it adds a flourish that provides evidence of ability to craft excellent content. Their stationery is more restrained than the website homepage – which I think is ruined by too many green links and a too small type size. An awesome guy called John Simmons works through them. His books about the role of copy in branding are seminal works, ‘We, Me, Them & It’ is the first. A highly recommended read.

        • http://bpando.wordpress.com Richard Baird

          Perhaps the flourish suggests creativity? – I think I’d warm to that, must slow down on my responses, not usually like me to make such a snap judgement. I’ll add the book to my reading list, always looking a ways to integrate my writing experience with my branding and identity projects.