BPO


Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Ryan Edy is a UK based, award-winning advertising and editorial photographer whose clients have included Vodafone, Wilkinson & Wetherell and Innov-8. Design studio Founded worked with Ryan Edy to develop a brand identity treatment that, based around a simple, familiar but communicative framing device, also went on to include both print and digital portfolio design.

Wordmark design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

“Introducing obvious icons from a client’s professional field to form part of their identity is something we would normally avoid. However when approached by the incredibly talented photographer Ryan Edy (pronounced Eedy), we couldn’t resist the opportunity to create something beautiful with the right angle in the capital ‘R’ and break one of our own rules. The identity is stripped back to just the view finder frame elements when overlaid onto Ryan’s stunning images, or used within promotional material such as emails or digital portfolios.” — Founded

Logo design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

Built around a logotype of light, monolinear, sans-serif characters, plenty of space and cut across the R, Founded’s visual identity treatment neatly conveys, with an uppercase authority and sense of contemporary experience, photographic framing in a familiar but distinctive way. The logotype’s fine lines and plenty of internal space has a lightness that sits well over Ryan Edy’s work. The mixed fibre substrate of the business cards and texture of the folders adds a tactile, crafted quality and a little more depth to the identity that extends beyond the visual nature of photography and typographic play of the logotype.

Logo design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

Logo design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

As acknowledged by Founded, this approach does rely on what could easily be described as an industry trope, however, it would be difficult not to acknowledge the communicative clarity universality offers but also the challenge it can also pose. Simple and unforced in its execution, within the context of some compelling and well-shot images, and alongside a couple of interesting material textures, the approach to print tempers familiarity with detail and distinction.

Design: Founded
Opinion: Richard Baird

Logo and mixed fibre business card design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

Logo and website design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

Logo and website design by Founded for advertising and editorial photographer Ryan Edy

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Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

Visual identity and print for photographer Ryan Edy designed by Founded

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  • Dario Calonaci

    Shutterstock anyone?

    • Looks nothing like Shutterstock.

      • Dario Calonaci
        • The viewfinder is a universal form that is understood by a broad demographic, anyone is entitled to use it.

          • Anthony Rodriguez

            True, but to use the same upper-left and lower-right angles along with the same “framing” device as shutterstock smacks of unoriginality, even if this ID and application is better. This feels beautiful and elegant, but just a little research by Founded should have relegated this to the “good idea, but let’s not copy an existing brand” pile.

          • I disagree but do appreciate having another opinion on the site.

          • Anthony

            In reference to the Shutterstock comments. Ryan Edy’s identity was created by Founded and in the public domain in early 2011. Shutterstock rebranded in 2012.

          • Thanks for putting that one to bed.

  • Flo

    Perfect.

  • DC

    Sorry but I’ve seen this done a million times.

    • No reason to be sorry. I do agree it’s a very familiar device that has been used over and over again, that doesn’t mean it’s any less communicative. As a logo-type that uses an original name it’s inherently unique to Ryan.

      • DC

        Is it right just to say ‘well, a lot of photographers use this device but none of them are called Ryan Edy so using it is fine, we’ll get away with it?’ That’s a bit lazy to me and they’re not doing their client any favours at all.

        Anyway, I’d better go, I’m designing a logo for a delivery company and I’m thinking of using an arrow in the negative space. It’s ok though because they’re not called FedEx!

        • In my opinion it’s right to use a universal device to quickly communicate with your audience. The viewfinder, like map pins, keys, arrows etc are tools open to everyone, it’s really how you choose to use them.

          A typographic direction will always benefit from the uniqueness of a name within a particular industry.

          But also the use of particular line weight, rounded terminals, uppercase characters, material choice and the original photography of the website all contribute to an original piece.

          I’ll humour you by suggesting that you could indeed use an arrow for your delivery company, many do, but if you stuck it between an Ex – which in the very unlikely event you had a name that conveniently facilitated such detail – used a heavy sans serif and coloured it red and orange I’d certainly question your motivation.

          May I ask why you haven’t put your name to your opinions?

          • DC

            The identity looks beautiful and has been very well crafted, and the website is lovely. I’m simply questioning the use of the device. Like the designers say themselves, normally something so obvious is generally avoided.

            I’m not saying it’s bad but I’m not saying it’s great either.

            I think we’ll have to agree to disagree.

            By the way, my name’s David, although I’m unsure what that has to do anything?

          • Sure, I really do appreciate you adding your opinion it is valued and certainly adds to the article.

            With regards to names on comments, I think that it’s important that people sharing an opinion stand up and put their name to it rather than what might be perceived as ‘hiding’ behind an initial.

  • okay, so it’s a bit overused within the photography industry, but in this case it’s well implemented. I think I’m with Rich on this one 😉

    • Yeah wouldn’t disagree with that, I think with the pace of technology and the visual lexicon that comes with it there’s always going to be new tools for us to use, until then we’ll seen more viewfinders and map pins etc.

      I can’t remember the article but it was about the over-valuing of originality and the time, expense and often futile nature associated with its discovery. A designer’s role is to communicate, not to waste money on seeking out new – and by definition unfamiliar – ways of conveying information (often for their own satisfaction), it is to draw on the established and surround it with something that communicates a broader set of values beyond the one dimensionality of say a viewfinder.

      Rant over.

      Thanks joining in Stuart, really appreciated.

  • Jamin Galea

    It is a very common device, but the way you use it is key as Rich said!

    Same idea but with great observation and the opportunity was taken; why not?
    http://theclickdesign.com/projects/ricky-joe-burrage/

    • Nice find, I think there’s still plenty of creativity left in the viewfinder.

    • What do you think of the new Grid View feature?

      • Jamin Galea

        It’s good yeah, it’s very handy when I’m in one of those “i think i’ve seen it on this blog before” scenarios and know what I’m looking for. Thanks!

  • Sam Flaherty

    Great to see a bit of debate going on. After all, that’s the point of blogs like these.

    In my humble opinion, I think I lean slightly towards the ‘overused’ school of thought. My initial impression was that I’d seen this device all over town, but that this particular iteration was done in a much nicer way. I did have a thought though, that maybe we’ve seen this device a lot because we’re designers. We surround ourselves with visual language. Mr Non-Designer who stumbles across Ryan’s photography might never have seen it before. Or even a potential new client. After all, I’m sure that’s who the new branding is geared towards.

    • Hi Sam my apologies for the late reply, glad you could chip in.

      I agree, design, for designers, is a microcosm, we see it changing literally day by day, we see the origins of ideas and how they saturate or dissipate. Non-designers, while increasingly design literate are not necessarily privy to such a density of similar communication tools. They are looking for clear pieces of information within a noisy macrocosm and it’s our job to provide that.

      There’s nothing wrong with dipping into the pot and appropriating the familiar, that’s how communication works. For me creativity and originality comes with execution.