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Matthew Hilton Watch designed by Spin

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Watch packaging design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Matthew Hilton is a designer working with De La Espada to bring together craftsmanship, premium materials and advanced manufacturing technologies to produce high quality furniture. Spin, the agency responsible for developing Matthew Hilton’s brand identity, have recently completed the packaging of his first time piece as well as the print for the launch event.

Spin’s juxtaposition of low-fi corrugated card, mechanical stamp and efficient sans-serif typography alongside the current favour for bright dyed board, foil and edge painted detail, the technicality of the illustration’s fine line weights and the contemporary geometric build of the monogram, all set set over the organic lines of a crafted wooden box, delivers high contrast and communicative impact that feels like a solid reflection of the basic functionality of a time piece and the balance between high quality craftsmanship and machined precision.

Logo design by Spin for Matthew Hilton

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Watch packaging design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Watch packaging design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Watch packaging design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Watch packaging design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Design for print by Spin for Matthew Hilton

Stationery design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Stationery design by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Print by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

Website by Spin for furniture designer Matthew Hilton

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  • Sam Flaherty

    Overall, a very sophisticated design that talks perfectly to the minimalism of the product. However, in my opinion it operates too similarly to Uniform Wares – particularly the illustrative style. It might not matter, the reason I raise the comparison is that the two brands exist and function in the same market. http://www.creativejournal.com/posts/530-uniform-wares-six

    • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

      OK, I certainly see the similarities, I would however counter that such a familiar technical aesthetic really does serve the communicative purpose of both pieces.

      Here it feels like the logical communicative choice rather than an intentional derivative.

  • Ion Turcanu

    Appart from the packaging, I really love their logo!

  • A. Malcolm

    I appreciate both Sam’s point and Richards counter argument. However had this not been produced by one of the UK’s top design agency’s, I do believe there would have been a social media shit storm and witch hunt regarding the similarities between the projects.

    It serves as proof that the design community at large, is a fickle and selective breed of sycophants.

    • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

      Selective in the sense that you feel I may be burying my head in the sand with regards to similarities? And that I should take a stronger stand by not publishing the project?

      I’m very much on the side of clear, straightforward communication that directly informs the aesthetic, to me both make a lot of sense, it wouldn’t surprise me if they emerged independently. There is of course a due diligence to be done, the saturation of design on-line makes this a lot easier however things do slip by. Spin’s position within the design community certainly affords them some degree of benefit of the doubt don’t you think?

      I’m sure that if Six feels differently they’re very capable of engaging with Spin without the need for said shit storm.

      Just a thought and do welcome your opinion.

      • A.Malcolm

        That’s exactly my point… “Spin’s position within the design community certainly affords them some degree of benefit of the doubt” — Would the same benefits apply to the smaller unknown agencies who have their ideas emerge independently?

        I’m sure Six are capable of engaging with Spin… but whether its via social media or not (I imagine) depends on the accused.

        My comments regarding the ‘selectiveness’ of our industry is aimed at a much broader audience and not you or your blog post(s) specifically.

        • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

          I would assume a position such as theirs has been founded on an originality, integrity and happy clients. You can only get so far plagiarising working. There is of course a potential complacency at the top but don’t think that’s really the case here.

          On a side note, I treat all agencies the same, I’m just looking for good work, it really doesn’t matter where it comes from.

      • http://www.wearemiller.com/ Yael Miller

        Enjoyed this little dialogue. My two cents – when you engage in a very minimalist, stripped-down brand aesthetic, you are bound to have this type of overlap. It’s virtually inevitable. There are less brand elements to combine and give each brand a more distinctive identity. This is the potential danger of going the minimalist route in creating a strongly ownable identity. Thus, very minute details become much more magnified in their significance.

        • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

          I agree, and glad you added your opinion. I believe we must also temper what we see above with the approach to service, the design of the watches and the experience people receive at the private view. These have, in my view, far more influence on brand perception and differentiation than a single piece of print.

          I recognise that when I see a few isolated elements, be that print, packaging or brand identity, published on a blog that these are just one part of what is likely to be a broader experience.