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Tina Frey Designs by Mucho, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

Tina Frey is an American homeware designer with a studio in San Francisco. She is inspired by the fluid lines of the sea, the curves and contours of nature, objects picked up while traveling, and the translucent colour of ice lollies and jelly beans. The design of each of her products—which include plates, bowls and utensils—is rooted in simplicity and functionality. These are sculpted by hand in clay, cast in colour in small batches, then sanded and finished by hand. This process gives each object a high-quality and uniquely crafted character.

Drawing on the organic shapes and hand crafted nature of the range, graphic design studio Mucho created a new visual identity for Tina Frey with a soft and sculpted quality—in form, colour and texture—and a contemporary restraint, while the use of brighter colour introduces contrast, a conviviality and communicative breadth. This links brochure, note cards, business cards and posters.

Monogram for San Francisco based homeware business Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

The monogram’s constant single line weight, recurring curves, parallel lines, ligature and rounded terminals successfully draw on the simple forms of Tina’s work, whilest also leveraging a little of the individuality and craft origins of the traditional monogram. It has a simplicity rooted in the ability to draw it with a single finger in clay but also in a current favour for reduction and the monolinear.

Logo and embossed business card for San Francisco based homeware business Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

Heavy and uncoated white board and a pillow emboss make a connection with the material texture and three-dimensionality of Tina’s objects, while a light clay ink, the curves of the monogram’s container, the use of space, and the layouts of the business cards draw on simplicity, natural form and functionality, and Tina’s penchant for uninterrupted surfaces.

Although subtle, the changing shape of the monogram’s container offers a variety without being superfluous or contradictory, and places product at the heart of brand identity.

Logo and embossed business card for San Francisco based homeware business Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

Logo and embossed business card for San Francisco based homeware business Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

Visual identity and brochure for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

The brochure, note cards and posters are bound by a top down look at Tina’s portfolio, the first with photography and the others with illustration. The connection is clear but the tone set is different. Here there is a contrast that matches conviviality and play against modernity and restraint, keeping the identity visually interesting and cohesive whilst also securing a communicative breadth. More from Mucho on BP&O.

Design: Mucho. Photography: Roc Canals. Opinion: Richard Baird.

Visual identity and print for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

Visual identity and print for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

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Visual identity and poster for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

What do you think of Mucho’s brand identity work for Tina Frey Designs? Share your thoughts in the comment section below or get the conversation started on Twitter.

Visual identity and poster for Tina Frey Designs by graphic design studio Mucho

More brand identity design work by Mucho:

Logo - Fundació Joan Miró  Logo - Balclis  Logo - Coma


  • the colour really makes this come alive, looks a bit bland without it.

    • CB

      But her work is not colorful.

      • While there’s clearly a lot of cues taken from Tina’s work, it doesn’t need to completely overwhelm identity or come at the expense of conveying a little of Tina’s personality. It could be a reflection of her love for colour as outlined in the intro, or there to simple offer contrast and visual interest when a physical product isn’t available to experience (postcards, brochure and posters).

        • yeah if you look at the bursts of yellow, it works so well with the grey and white in the brochure and postcards.

  • Renata Alcantara

    looooove it.