BPO


BP&O Collections — Blind Embossing

Selected by Richard Baird.

A continually updated gallery of brand identity, packaging and graphic design, reviewed and published on BP&O, that feature a blind emboss or debossed detail. This post features work by Bibliothèque, Triboro and Bedow, and covers a variety of projects, from restaurants and lighting architects to galleries and fashion labels.

Blind embossing has been used in a few different ways. These include simple stylistic flourishes, an exploration of the intersection of the graphic and material, and those grounded in the more conceptual. These conceptual approaches include the framing of words for art gallery Galerija Kranjčar, a recurring H motif by Mucho for Héctor Ayuso, and a reference to light and shade by Triboro for their work with lighting architects L’Observatoire International. Be sure to click the images to read more about the project and the ideas and intentions of each design.

 

Flamingo by Bibliothèque, United Kingdom

 

Blind Embossing – Flamingo by Bibliothèque, United Kingdom

 

Brae by Round, Australia

 

Blind Embossing – Brae by Round, Australia

 

L’Observatoire International by Triboro, United States

 

Blind Embossing – L’Observatoire International by Triboro, United States

Triboro’s work for architectural lighting specialists L’Observatoire International effectively and appropriately plays with light and shadow. This comes through in print with a combination of blind emboss and debossed print finishes, casting shadows and creating highlights in different directions across an uncoated white board.

 

Planned Living Architects by A Friend Of Mine, Australia

 

Blind Embossing – Planned Living Architects by A Friend Of Mine, Australia

A Friend Of Mine take the familiar light and shade often employed throughout architectural brand identity projects, expressed through blind embossing, however, in conjunction with a graphic device informed by natural topology, builds in a second communicative layer and moment of visual interest.

 

Galerija Kranjčar by Bunch, Croatia

 

Blind Embossing – Galerija Kranjčar by Bunch, Croatia

Bunch’s use of a framing device, a frequent tool of gallery brand identity programmes, is distinctive in its material rather than graphic qualities, framing print space through highlight and shadow rather than ink. It is a small detail, but one that manages to draw something new from a familiar concept. It also works well to inject an element of identity into full bleed images in the absence of logotype, without distracting from their content.

 

Minna Palmqvist by Bedow, Sweden

 

Blind Embossing – Minna Palmqvist by Bedow, Sweden

Bedow use the subtle blind debossing of white board for Minna Palmqvist’s swing tags. These are likely to sit well over the designer’s clothing range, establish a continuity and offer contrast to and emphasising through disparity, the texture, shapes and detail of fabrics.

 

Taidehalli by Tsto, Finland

 

Blind Embossing – Taidehalli by Tsto, Finland

 

Bryan Pearson by Strategy, New Zealand

 

Blind Embossing – Bryan Pearson by Strategy, New Zealand

 

Héctor Ayuso by Mucho, Spain

 

Blind Embossing – Héctor Ayuso by Mucho, Spain

Rather than employing a logo-centric approach to the unconventional character of Héctor Ayuso, Mucho use die cutting and blind debossing to draw an H from rectangular print communications.

 

Estampaciones Fuerte by Hey, Spain

 

Blind Embossing – Estampaciones Fuerte by Hey, Spain

Using a large blind deboss Hey finds a smart and compelling balance between the graphic and the material, process and product for cold metal stamping and pressing business Estampaciones Fuerte.

 

 

Giles Duley by Shaz Madani, United Kingdom

 

Blind Embossing – Giles Duley by Shaz Madani, United Kingdom

Giles Duley is known for capturing humanitarian issues, bringing to light the consequences of conflict and the human spirit with dignity, creating through his photographs an “intimacy and empathy” for lives that differ from ours only in circumstance. This sensitivity and intimate approach is encapsulated in the restraint of Shaz Madani’s visual identity design, and the interplay between unassuming type and the way it is embedded into the raw materiality of uncoated and unbleached papers and boards using a blind deboss.

 

Institute by Commission, United Kingdom

 

Blind Embossing – Institute by Commission, United Kingdom

 

Niche Wine Co. — Somm by Frost, Australia

 

Blind Embossing – Niche Wine Co. — Somm by Frost, Australia

 

Background Bars by Campbell Hay, United Kingdom

 

Blind Embossing – Background Bars by Campbell Hay, United Kingdom

 

Sant Francesc by Mucho, Spain

 

Blind Embossing – Sant Francesc by Mucho, Spain

 

Minke by Atipo, Spain

 

Die Cutting in Branding – Minke by Atipo, Spain

For print production company Minke design studio Atipo explore the relationship between the graphic and the material through blind embossing across a variety of colourful dyed uncoated boards, and the addition of a die cut sleeve and contrasting substrate.

 

This post was published as a quick way to browse through BP&O’s content and get access to older but equally interesting projects through different themes, and expands on previous posts under the category The Best of BP&O. This series can be subscribed to here.