BPO


Crabapple Kitchen designed by Swear Words

Logo design by Swear Words for Crabapple Kitchen

Located on Hawthorn’s Glenferrie Road, Victoria, Crabapple Kitchen is a ‘high-end café/wine bar’ with an ever-changing menu of simple, rustic and seasonal Italian, French and Spanish cuisine created from local produce and served in a ‘homely and light-hearted environment’ – derived from the French and Italian countryside – made up of ‘beautiful fabrics, French pantries, hanging copper pots, comfy banquettes and an open fireplace’.

Continue reading this article


Highpark designed by Face

Gold block foil black business card design by Face for luxury Mexican property development Highpark

Highpark is a new residential project located in the middle of San Pedro Garza García and described by Face – the agency behind the development’s visual identity, print work and website – as ‘arguably one of Latin America’s most affluent municipalities’ and widely credited as an “architectural masterpiece”.

Face go on to say that the “project needed to speak volumes about the brand’s commitment to creativity, sophistication, and quality of lifestyle. It was conceived by superstar Mexican architect Michel Rojkind, and envisioned as an urban development of luxury residences in northern Mexico’s most exclusive corner.” As such Face created a “clean, polished, unobtrusive aesthetic designed to beautifully showcase the project, using sharp, classic typography, and the fool-proof duo of black and gold.”

Continue reading this article


Daniel Hopwood designed by Two Times Elliott

Logo design by Two Times Elliott for Daniel Hopwood

Daniel Hopwood is a small bespoke London-based multidisciplinary design studio – working within the fields of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design – that offers its clients a creative, practical and personal service.

The studio’s identity, created by Two Times Elliott, takes the often ornamental detail of monograms of the past—a traditional distillation of a craftsman’s pride in product quality and individualised service practice—and gives it a very contemporary, geometric resolution with a solid sense of structure— through a simple consistent line weight and negative space—and a duality that mixes an H with what looks like a table and chair pictogram. Set alongside the broad, generously spaced characters of a sans-serif logo-type and a striking economical single red spot colour, the identity achieves a nice but subtle thematic union of layout, build, furnishing and functionality while the use of an uncoated, mixed-fibre, recycled substrate and a blind deboss across the collateral add a crafted, sustainable undertone that conveys an appreciation for material and material texture.

Continue reading this article