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UAL 2017–18 Campaign by Spy, United Kingdom

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brochures by Spy for the University of the Arts London 2016–17 campaign

The University of the Arts London is Europe’s largest specialist arts and design university. It is made up of six colleges, each with its own unique character and programme, yet unified in their effort to deliver a high quality creative eduction. This united position is expressed through a visual identity system developed by Pentagram partner Domenic Lippa. Based around Helvetica, UAL’s visual identity affords each college the opportunity to experiment with its own approach to visual communication.

This week London-based graphic design studio Spy published images of their work on UAL’s 2016 campaign for the 2017–2018 academic year, developed for Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon. Spy were commissioned, for the second year, to develop an engaging brand campaign that would drive student recruitment and brand awareness. The campaign included posters, brochure, flyers and animations.

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YO! by Paul Belford Ltd, United Kingdom

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brand identity, illustration and chopstick packaging for restaurant chain Yo! Sushi designed by London-based Paul Belford Ltd.

London-based graphic design studio Paul Belford Ltd. worked with UK restaurant chain YO! Sushi, now Yo!, to rebrand, as it expands into the US, the Middle East and further into Europe. This included an updated logo together with an extensive 200 page brand book, presented in a bespoke Japanese bento box, that covered a variety of new assets. The brand book covers menus, packaging, signage and illustrative noren curtains, as well as a guide to art direction.

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John Lewis Childrenswear by Charlie Smith Design, UK

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brand identity and tags for John Lewis Childrenswear Department by Charlie Smith Design, London, UK

London-based studio Charlie Smith Design worked with British department store John Lewis to develop the visual identity system and packaging for their childrenswear department. The system needed to appeal to girls and boys aged from 2 to 14 (and presumably their parents), and connect a broad range of accessories and garments that included denim, swimwear, shoes and underwear.

The result is as a contemporary and playful typographic treatment across tags that use arrangement to call out gender, colour to identify different sizes, and materiality to establish a useful communicative contrast yet visual continuity throughout.

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