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Clay by Studio Claus Due, Denmark

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding for Clay — Museum of Ceramic Art Denmark by Studio Claus Due

Clay is a museum of ceramic arts and crafts, located in the Danish town of Middelfart, west of the capital. Exhibits range from a 235 year old plate to more recent and experimental pieces from contemporary artists. The museum worked with Studio Claus Due to develop a new visual identity system. This included business cards, stationery, signage, packaging, print communication and website, unified by an earthy colour palette and custom typography, punctuated by shots of blue and yellow, and featuring uncoated materials.

This post was updated 10/16 with extra project shots, and coincides with the studio’s name change from Designbolaget to Studio Claus Due, and the launch of its new website.

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MOS Architects by Studio Lin, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Visual identity, print and promotion by Studio Lin for New York based architectural practice MOS.

MOS is an American architectural practice that mixes playful experimentation with serious research. The practice, as it exists now, following two years of what seems to be an informal approach, was established in 2005, and has worked through a range of design experiments it describes as a make-believe of architectural fantasies, problems, and thoughts on what the practice would be building in the future. MOS now has a broad portfolio that includes institutions, housing and retail, installations, furniture, essays, software and film.

MOS Architect’s brand identity, developed by New York based Studio Lin, has a stripped down aesthetic with an intentionally generic quality that uses on-demand printing processes to cover promotional pieces, request for quote documents, publications, stationery and business cards.

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Edouard Malingue Gallery by Lundgren+Lindqvist, Sweden

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Posters for Edouard Malingue Gallery by graphic design studio Lundgren+Lindqvist

Edouard Malingue Gallery exhibits work by emerging and established artists from around the world across its 6000 sq ft space in central Hong Kong. Through collaborations with international curators, and its own publications, alongside solo exhibitions, the gallery looks to introduce art into public spaces and to stimulate public discourse.

The gallery features an interior that juxtaposes the white unblemished walls and plinths you might expect from a modern art gallery with the irregular qualities and cool greys of cast concrete, exposed utilities, strip lighting above and grey tiles below. It also utilises a visual identity system developed by Swedish graphic design studio Lundgren+Lindqvist. This was launched to coincide with the gallery’s move to larger premises.

Lundgren+Lindqvist’s visual identity concept makes a connection between the three strokes of a simplified E and M (the initials of Edouard Malingue), the three words that make up the gallery’s name (Edouard Malingue Gallery) and its location on 33 Deux Veux Street. This is visualised as trisections through a grid system which underpins the print and website layout of custom typography, and informs the number folds across leaflets, letters and posters.

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Room Essentials by Collins, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Logo, photography and packaging by Collins for Target's modernistic home furnishings range Room Essentials

Room Essentials is a line of modernist home furnishings created and sold by American retailer Target. The range covers over 2,000 products across 60 categories, and includes items such as blankets, lighting, chairs, tables and tableware.

While securing significant revenue for the retailer, the range has, over the last five years, experienced a downturn in sales generated by its Millennial demographic. With this in mind, and with the intention of recapturing the enthusiasm for and interest in the range, Target commissioned New York based Collins to reimagine Room Essential’s brand identity.

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