Silver Block Foil

BPO


Colours May Vary by Build, United Kingdom

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Logotype, custom typeface and tote bags by Build for Leeds based creative lifestyle store, independent bookshop and events space

Colours May Vary is a Leeds based creative lifestyle store, independent bookshop and events space. Its physical and digital stores are filled with a variety of products, from riso prints, books and magazines to ceramic sculptures, cards and banners. There is a variety to these objects, yet a curatorial through line of beauty and usefulness that makes the Colours May Vary name appropriate. Developing this, design studio Build created a visual identity of shape play, typographical modernity and idiosyncrasy, colour and form contrast, and a meeting of striking graphic expression and high quality material finish. This links a variety of assets. These included printed items such as tote bags, postcards, loyalty cards, carrier bags and stickers, as well as digital components like social media icons, promotional images, newsletter template and a website designed and built by Hungry Sandwich Club.

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St. ERHARD by Bedow, Sweden

Opinion by Richard Baird

New label design by Swedish studio for three distinct beers from German brewery St Erhard

With a desire to stand out, and in response to the extensive saturation of heritage-related visual cues throughout the German beer market, brewery St. ERHARD worked outside of the country with Swedish studio Bedow to develop a modern graphic identity for three of its brews. Farmer, Mayflower and Saison are premium beers, each of which are crafted, brewed and bottled by St. Erhard in the Bamberg area of Northern Bavaria.

Bedow’s work is characterised by a strong use of contrast, a graphic simplicity and immediacy. This can be seen in the meeting of curvy traditional structure and rectilinear labelling, in the mix of black ink, white substrate and colourful foiling, in the reductive typographical form of the range and the more conventional logotype of St. ERHARD, and finally, the systematic nature of the collection yet the irregularity and playful character of each label.

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