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LogoArchive – Logo Redux by Darren Leader

LogoArchive Zine Logo Redux is special collaborative Extra Issue designed by Darren Leader and dedicated to renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive returns with its fifth collaborative Extra Issue: Logo Redux, dedicated to the fascinating theme of Renaissance printers’ marks. These marks, many drawn from the 15th century, appear somewhat modernist in nature. As such, this Extra Issue functions as a “prequel” to previous LogoArchive issues, and positions printers’ marks as a precursor to the modernist corporate trademarks of the mid-century.

Conceptualised by designer, educator and researcher Darren Leader, working in collaboration with Unlocking The Archive, the University of East Anglia and editor Richard Baird, this Extra Issue intends to revive interest in printers’ marks and the inventive typography of renaissance publishing.

Logo Redux is a Limited Edition run, these can be ordered at logoarchive.shop.

Logo Redux is a unique material gesture made up of four parts that, through design and production, weaves together and brings to life aspects of a period of significant technological and cultural development and their influence on print publishing.

Part 1–Dust Jacket: In a bold departure from earlier issues, and with the intention of positioning the booklet as a “prequel” to previous issues, a type-first design sits over the printers’ marks creating a dynamic interplay between type (historical context) and form (art and design), as well as the renaissance and modernist movements. This is developed further in the interplay between Suisse Int’l used in previous issues and Almost from Poem, itself an expression of contemporary interpretations of historical references. A double hit of Pantone 200 (Red) draws on many of the archived pieces of renaissance publishing that can be found at Unlocking The Archive, and throughout historical documents.

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

The dust jacket opens out to present a number loose cards, an insert and bound booklet. Sixties 60gsm from Fenner, a light and delicate bible paper, conjures up some of the material qualities of renaissance publishing. Type and form intersect each other to create a dialogue. As with previous issues, this dialogue does not exist on the surface, but in the three different print technologies used for this issue. Foiling (Heidelberg), lithography and digital form a technological narrative thread.

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

Part 2–Cards: “Variation” – Four cards, carrying 20 distinctive printers’ marks, present the striking design qualities and differences of the marks used by renaissance printers to distinguish their businesses and craft. As loose cards, these offer an opportunity for comparison and, in the spirit of involvement that characterises the work of Unlocking The Archive, readers are invited to create their own cover by reordering the cards in combination with the dust jacket.

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

Part 3–Booklet: “Reflection” The Logo Redux booklet offers a reflection on the connection between the renaissance printers’ mark and modernist trademarks of the mid-century, positioning these as the “final ornament”. Further, Darren Leader explores the technological and cultural shifts that gave purpose to printers’ marks. And finally, Dr Thomas Roebuck and Dr Sophie Butler explore the value of the printers’ mark and the value of the bound book.

The Logo Redux booklet includes three texts: The Final Ornament by LogoArchive Editor Richard Baird, Dialogue with the Distant Past by Designer Darren Leader and Valuing Printers’ Marks by co-founders of Unlocking The Archive Dr Sophie Butler and Dr Tom Roebuck. Each intends to present different ways of looking at the printers’ marks of this issue.

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

Part 4–Insert: “Evolution” A case study of the historic links between the logos of William Caxton and Wynkyn De Worde. Printed using digital and traditional foiling techniques on a 1955 Heidelberg Press, and finished with a glossy black edge detail, and drawing on the inventive and modern composition of a blackletter text this insert intends to connect past and present. Dust jacket and insert then coalesce to form the complete reverse of Logo Redux.

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks

This issue was printed by Identity Print (Dust jacket) and With Print (Cards, Insert & Booklet) on Accent Antique from G.F Smith and Sixties from Fenner. It features Suisse Int’l from Swiss Typefaces, Almost from Poem and English Texture from Hoefler & Co. It is published and distributed by BP&O and part of LogoArchive series, created by Richard Baird. This issue was conceptualised and designed by Darren Leader, working in collaboration with Unlocking The Archive, and UTA co-founders Dr Sophie Butler and Tom Roebuck, who also provided texts. It is supported and part funded by the University of East Anglia.

Logo Redux is available at logoarchive.shop.

Specifications:

Cards: Digital, With Print, 4 x 2pp, 240gsm Accent Antique Magnolia, HP Indigo Black (x5). Booklet: Digital, With Print, 8pp, 110gsm Accent Antique Magnolia, HP Indigo Black (x5), White Staples. Insert: Foil Blocking + Digital, With Print, 2pp 300gsm, GF Smith Accent Antique Magnolia, Gloss Black Foil & HP Indigo Black (x5), Gloss Black Foiled Edges. Dust Jacket :  Offset, Identity Print, 4pp, 60gsm Sixties, Pantone 200 (x2).

LogoArchive Extra Issue: Logo Redux. Renaissance printers' marks


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