BPO


Bedre Kommunikasjon designed by Work In Progress

Bedre Kommunikasjon designed by Work In Progress

Bedre Kommunikasjon is a oslo-based consulting firm, run by communication specialist Nils M. Apeland, that offers personal, professional and independent advice to business, drawn from 20 years of analysis, strategy, promotion, media relations and crisis management experience.

Multidisciplinary design agency Work In Progress recently worked with Nils to develop a new visual identity solution which included a logo, business card and stationery design that, through a concept that plays on the name Bedre Kommunikasjon, Norwegian for “better communication”, and visualised through a word-puzzle device with hidden messages highlighted by the recipient across a notebook and business card, conveys the themes of communication and analysis in a distinctive way.

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Síol Studio designed by Mucho

Logo and blind emboss stationery for San Francisco-based architecture studio Síol created by Mucho

San Francisco-based architecture studio Síol recently commissioned multidisciplinary design agency Mucho to develop a new visual identity solution that would embody “their philosophy of conceptual, clean architecture for both interior and exterior design.” Based around a customised sans-serif logotype executed as a blind deboss, the identity conveys the familiar architectural themes of light and shadow formed within three-dimensional space and a practical, corporate efficiency.

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Daniel Hopwood designed by Two Times Elliott

Logo design by Two Times Elliott for Daniel Hopwood

Daniel Hopwood is a small bespoke London-based multidisciplinary design studio – working within the fields of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design – that offers its clients a creative, practical and personal service.

The studio’s identity, created by Two Times Elliott, takes the often ornamental detail of monograms of the past—a traditional distillation of a craftsman’s pride in product quality and individualised service practice—and gives it a very contemporary, geometric resolution with a solid sense of structure— through a simple consistent line weight and negative space—and a duality that mixes an H with what looks like a table and chair pictogram. Set alongside the broad, generously spaced characters of a sans-serif logo-type and a striking economical single red spot colour, the identity achieves a nice but subtle thematic union of layout, build, furnishing and functionality while the use of an uncoated, mixed-fibre, recycled substrate and a blind deboss across the collateral add a crafted, sustainable undertone that conveys an appreciation for material and material texture.

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