BPO


MoMA by Order

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding for MoMA 2020 designed by New York-based Order, design, print, web design

The MoMA logotype, set in Franklin Gothic No. 2 and designed by Ivan Chermayeff, is an icon, and has been part of the New York urban landscape and international museum graphic vernacular since its creation in 1964. With evolving communicative needs and channels, the MoMA logotype was made a central graphic device as part of a new visual identity launched in 2009. Created by Pentagram and MoMA’s Creative Director for Graphics and Advertising Julia Hoffmann, this flexible visual identity was developed to bring a systematised and cohesive programme to print, web and environmental applications.

In 2019, MoMA expanded its 53rd Street location, adding 40,000 sq. ft. of new gallery space. This will showcase more of its collection with the intention of better representing and balancing a diversity of backgrounds, periods, media, and geographies, with a performative quality at the heart of its galleries. Just as in 2009, new approaches to communication; moving from exhibition-focused campaigns to a seasonal approach, required a revision to the MoMA visual identity to coincide with its expansion. New York-based Order reviewed and then defined what they described as a more modular, adaptable, and scalable design system for the museum’s communications, alongside the recommendation of a seasonal approach. This included updating the PS1 and Design Store logos, adding these as brand extensions of MoMA’s singular institutional mark. All additional applications were then designed and produced in house by the MoMA Design Studio, these included newsprint advertising, design store catalogue covers, member’s day programmes, banners, map and tickets.

Continue reading this article


Lookbooks by Studio Lowrie

Opinion by Richard Baird

Visual identity design and bookmarks by London-based Studio Lowrie for online speciliast bookstore Look Books

Lookbooks is an online bookstore that specialises in fun and quirky publications of the past. Recent acquisitions include Old Bohemian and Moravian Jewish Cemeteries by Petr Ehl, Arno Parik & Jiri Fiedler, 1991 and 101 Cake Design by Mary Ford, 1987. There is a cultural value to many of these, reflecting a time and particular niche interest, and how these niche interests were shared pre-internet. The bookstore’s brand identity, however, clearly positions this as a cheerful tongue-in-cheek activity with a cheerful lightness of tone in the logo, which doubles down on the double O pairings within the name to create expressionful graphic gestures. But, it is the bookmarks that really stand out. I simple little die-cut trick, in conjunction with book pages, gives a nose to the eyes. A smart idea by London-based Studio Lowrie.

Continue reading this article


Lagotto by Studio Hi Ho

Opinion by Richard Baird

Logotype, visual identity, business cards and packaging by Studio Hi Ho for restaurant and food store Lagotto

Lagotto is a new all-day café, wine bar and food store situated inside Nth Fitzroy, a residential property development project from Milieu located at the heart of Melbourne’s, inner north. Named after the truffle-hunting Italian dog breed, the café offers a relaxed European surrounding in which to enjoy an Italian menu with a “joyful vibrancy that avoids kitschiness or pastiche”. Studio Hi Ho, also responsible for the visual identity of the Nth Fitzroy development, was commissioned to put forward a proposal for Lagotto that would resonate with the distinctive interior design scheme, the local community’s tastes and Mediterranean migrant history. This was achieved through type pairing, materiality and playful illustration by Ted Parker.

Continue reading this article