BPO


PopTech by Collins

Opinion by Richard Baird & Seth Rowden

Graphic identity and posters designed by Collins for annual conference PopTech

PopTech is an annual three-day conference that takes place in October in the American town of Camden, Maine. It is an occasion where people from across many different fields meet with the intention of discovering and exploring a shared potential that reaches far beyond individual aspirations and goes on to inspire positive collective action.

Attendees include scientists, technologists, humanitarians, designers, artists, innovators, academics, corporate and governmental leaders as well as those that defy conventional categorisation. The conference is made up of presentations, interactive sessions, dinners, chats and debates, movie screenings and music-making. Featured speakers have included tech pioneer Tim O’Riley, cultural philanthropist Stephanie Coontz and behavioural economist Dan Ariely.

New York based Collins worked with PopTech to design and creative direct the 2017 conference, to build this around the theme and potential to “Instigate”. This manifests itself visually in the intersection of form and colour, in the bisecting of type and the implications of convergence. This links a variety of assets that included posters, supergraphics, lanyards, motion graphics, video, bags and event brochures and programmes.

Continue reading this article


UNSW Built Environment by Toko

Opinion by Richard Baird

Graphic identity designed by Toko for the UNSW Build Environment faculty and exhibition design for the annual Luminocity exhibition

UNSW Built Environment (BE) intends to develop global leaders in architecture, planning and construction, and help shape resilient, connected, smart and inclusive future cities through its undergraduate, postgraduate and postgraduate research courses. As part of this, the faculty also runs an annual programme of events for students, academics, industry professionals and the general public. These serve as a platform to find out more about the faculty and raise the awareness of and seek to address critical issues that concern the built environment.

Australian design studio Toko worked with UNSW BE to develop a faculty graphic identity and the spacial design of their Luminocity exhibition; a collection of student projects drawn from all seven degree courses and bring to light what it might be like to design and build tomorrow’s cities. Assets included graduate and postgraduate guides, posters and website, signage, banners, display system and layout.

Continue reading this article


Daechung Park Cafe by Studio fnt

Opinion by Richard Baird

Graphic identity and coaster design by Studio fnt for South Korean cafe 대충유원지 Daechung Park

Daechung Park / 대충유원지 is a cafe located in the South Korean capital of Seoul. It features a distinctive interior of wood and stepped brick walls developed by FHHH Friends, furniture and objects by studio COM and a graphic identity designed Studio fnt. Graphic identity is expressed through menus, coasters, packaging and framed calligraphic posters, but also through small details within the interior and in the shaping of furniture.

Although Daechung translates as half-heartedness and has a kitschy Korean association the design of the cafe is not. It is a space with a clear purpose and mood, a place to unwind, to kick back and relax.

Each element; interior, furniture, objects, graphic identity and calligraphy establish a multi-disciplinary continuity and a shared form language. This draws its inspiration from architectural and digital landscapes but also from the other translation of Daechung, a word used in old Asia to describe tigers.

The literal translation of Daechung is (Dae, 大) big (Chung, 蟲) bug, a homonym made up of Chinese characters and an affectionate term for the tiger, an animal of cultural significance in Korea. These often appear as friendly characters in fables and folk paintings, and more recently as Olympic mascots. Here, the tiger reference appears as a character on coasters and posters, as stripes and patterns woven into the interior, or bringing a modernity to the traditional craft of calligraphy.

Continue reading this article