BPO


Cemento designed by S-T

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Logo and grey business card with white ink detail designed by S-T for UK based Italian cement veneer business Cemento

Cemento is the UK distributor of an Italian lightweight concrete product that can be used for wall panelling and furniture. Inspired by brutalist design — a movement that grew out of early 20th century modernist architecture and described by Wikipedia as being “linear, fortresslike and blockish” — London based studio S-T developed a visual identity for Cemento that included logo, logotype, brand guidelines, tote bag, box tape, brochure, postcards and business card design.

Using geometric form, sans-serif typography, dyed material choice, white ink, a repeating pattern and limited colour palette, S-T establishes a robust and distinctive solution that reflects the modular and functional nature of concrete, the aesthetic qualities of the product, and its adoption by contemporary furniture and interior designers.

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Pikseli designed by Werklig

Interior signage designed by Werklig for Helsinki office space Pikseli

Originally built in the 1980’s by wireless pioneer Digita Oy, Pikseli is a building, located in the Vallila district of Finland’s capital city Helsinki, that provides office space to companies working within the digital industries. Design agency Werklig, commissioned to develop a new visual identity for Pikseli to attract new tenants, created a solution that takes the tiny universal screen unit of a pixel and gives it a bold oversized quality as signage throughout the building.

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Traveller Espresso Bar by TCYK

Logo as a pin badge for Melbourne espresso bar Traveller designed by The Company You Keep

Traveller is the Melbourne based espresso bar of speciality coffee roaster and cafe operator Seven Seeds. Design agency The Company You Keep (TCYK) recently worked with Seven Seeds to develop a new visual identity solution for the Traveller that reflects an interior architecture of details such as ‘moulded plywood, vinyl and soft curves’ inspired by ‘the golden age of caravanning’, through period typography, signage shape, a simple illustrative mark and a single ink print treatment.

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