BPO


Outline by Studio South

Opinion by Richard Baird

Visual identity and brochure design by Studio South for Outline, a six lot property development opportunity in Auckland

Outline is a six lot freehold property development opportunity from Fearon Hay Architects located on Kings Road on the border of Mount Eden and Mount Roskill in a culturally and historically rich neighbourhood in Auckland. Each lot is 95m2 with the capacity to build four levels and include a roof living space totalling 300m2 of floor area. Studio South worked with Fearon Hay Architects to develop a visual identity for Outline.

Absent architecture, positioning focuses on the unlimited potential of each lot, with a language that speaks to families and those individuals and couples looking for modern and adaptable living and working spaces. This is achieved through a distinct series of illustrations and simple graphic gesture that runs across website and brochure design. The Outline project, while focusing on selling the lot and planning permissions, also seeks to facilitate, or at least ease, the way to design and build through connections to partners.

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Everlea by Studio Brave

Opinion by Richard Baird

Property branding for Everlea by Studio Brave featuring illustration by Tom Abbiss Smith.

Everlea is a new property development described as a private sanctuary of townhouses located in the Melbourne suburb of Keysborough, an expanding community marked by its space and natural surroundings of native trees, shrubs, parkland and a landscaped network of safe pedestrianised streets. Developed by SB&G, working in collaboration with Bruce Henderson Architects, landscape architects Tract and Kathy Demos, Everlea “offers a pairing of design expertise guided by a vision of individuality.” Naming and visual identity, designed by Studio Brave, is based around the notions of “establishing an authentic life”, “the everlasting landscape” and “space to grow”, and touches upon the themes of family, home, community and environment. This is expressed through a series of commissioned illustrations by UK artist Tom Abbiss Smith. These illustrations link every customer touchpoint, from bound booklets to binder to single house-style sheets and website.

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246 Queen by Studio South

Opinion by Richard Baird

Graphic identity by Studio South for 246 Queen, a retail, hospitality and business development within a mid-century modernist building in Auckland

246 Queen has a long and storied history. Opened in 1964 on Auckland’s Queen Street, it heralded a new era of modern architectural vision, exclusive boutique-based experience and an urban post-war retail sophistication. The building played host to fashion shows, designer concessions, furniture showrooms and contemporary dining. However, the architectural ideas drawn up by the original architects Rigby Mullan (Alan Rigby and Antony Mallen), remained only partially realised. These are now being paid homage to in the building’s renovation by the Wilshire Group working in collaboration with architects Fearon Hay, once again becoming a mixed-use space of food and drink, retail and commercial opportunities across eight floors.

Architectural details include a distinctive fascia of curved windows and accents, floor to ceiling central glass light well, exposed ceiling and concrete floors. This sits within a district of 20th-century architecture and mid-century landmarks, a broad range of coffee shops and casual dining, the Auckland Art Gallery and the century-old Albert Park.

The marketing of the building and its spaces is aimed at what are described as design-savvy directors. Those with companies within the creative sectors, smart PR, marketing, bespoke legal and financial services, those who have developed award-winning digital experiences or are tech innovators. Essentially, those with clients who expect the structure and space to fit the nature of the companies they intend to work with. In this way, modernist architecture functions as a material symbol of the pioneering spirit that now exists within the less material worlds of the service led and digital sectors.

The marketing language and the graphic identity of the building, designed by Auckland-based Studio South, draws on the history and original vision of the building. This revolves around the modernist, and aimed at those that recognise or are drawn in by mid-century architectural heritage and an associated graphic history, and desire access to contemporary international food and high-quality services in building and locally. This manifests itself through type and text, colour, material and structure, and through a graphic motif that is inspired by the building’s curved accents and large rounded windows.

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