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Inside Lottozero by Studio Mut

Text by Richard Baird.

Multi-lingual art book designed by Studio Mut for the exhibition Inside Lottozero at Lottozero / textile laboratories

Inside Lottozero was an exhibition of international artists that covered a wide-range of artistic disciplines. It was conceived by Arianna and Tessa Moroder and curated by Alessandra Tempesti. The exhibition took place at Lottozero / textile laboratories in Toscana, Italy and ran until November 20th, 2016. Under the concept of “Non-stop Fruition”, the exhibition opened with a 12 hour overnight event in which people were invited to stay and immerse themselves and connect more deeply with the artwork. This included 

The exhibition catalogue is a hardback 184 page book, edited by Tessa and Arianna Moroder, curated by Alessandra Tempesti and designed by Studio Mut. It features the 13 exhibiting artists, brings to light how wide-ranging textile art and research can be and is a tri-lingual publication that threads together English, Italian and German. These languages are graphically interwoven, with each language delineated by its orientation on the page.

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Inn Situ by Studio Mut

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Visual identity, programme and catalogue by Studio Mut for Austrian cultural event Inn Situ

Inn Situ is part of the cultural programme of BTV Bank and series of three events; a exhibition, a concert and panel discussion. This takes place two to three times a year in the Austrian city of Innsbruck. The events are distinctive in their approach, a Russian doll of nested narratives, with each layer responding to the next. Practically speaking, and exemplifying the idea, one event saw an internationally renowned photographer create a project for the Inn Situ gallery. A local musician then composed a concert that responded to the photographs which played twice in the concert hall next to the exhibition. This was then followed by a panel discussion that responded to both the exhibition and the concert.

The format remains consistent, there are always three events, with the panel discussion and concert both seeking to contextualise the themes of the artist and their the exhibition. So far, there have been three Inn Situ events, with a fourth due to take place soon. Each is accompanied by a printed programme and catalogue, plus a city-wide poster campaign designed Studio Mut in Italy. These share a similar material and visual language. For the sake of brevity, this article looks at the materials for Inn Situ 2. The framework of the visual identity and the format of the material outcome are the same, but each also folds in its own response to the themes present in the artwork to provokes the responses.

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New Architecture in South Tyrol 2012—2018 by Studio Mut

Opinion by Richard Baird

Book design and layout by Studio Mut for New Architecture in South Tyrol

New Architecture in South Tyrol—a travelling exhibition and catalogue—brings to light the unique architectural boom happening in Alto Adige, also known as South Tyrol, the predominantly German-speaking northern-most province of Italy.

Selected by an international jury, the catalogue focuses on fifty-nine buildings from the region, realised between 2012–2018, and have gained local contemporary architects international recognition. These buildings are marked by their keen sense of locality and materialisation. This is documented throughout the exhibition catalogue by way of images and plans. Texts in English, German and Italian augment these, providing a comprehensive survey of recent architectural trends and developments in the region with the intention of facilitating international comparison.

The design of the exhibition catalogue, developed by Studio Mut, channels the architectural continuities present within the region and draws these out through the immediacy of imagery and technical drawings, and explored playfully in the balance of type and space. In this, the design of the catalogue captures the “lively and innovative architectural scene” rooted in a rich tradition of craftsmanship, and set within, and often in contrast to, an alpine context.

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