BPO


OpenView by Pentagram, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding, custom typography and edge painted business cards by Pentagram for Boston-based venture capital firm OpenView.

OpenView is a Boston-based business dedicated to investing in and helping to grow what are described as expansion-stage companies that are working in the software development sector. OpenView has a unique hands-on approach, and worked with Pentagram’s Natasha Jen to express this through positioning, tone of voice and visual identity design. This included custom typography, stationery, business cards, website and interior graphics.

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Casa Bonay by Mucho, Spain

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brand identity design for Barcelona hotel Casa Bonay by Mucho, Spain

Casa Bonay is a unique hotel destination in the neighbourhood of Eixample Dret, Barcelona, housed within a historic nineteenth century building with a neo-classical façade. Although the setting has a strong historical value, inside and out, the hotel experience makes a connection with the creative talent that populates the city today. This is achieved through collaboration with pioneering chefs, young designers, renowned furniture brands and an independent publisher to create menus, interiors and books.

Casa Boney’s brand identity, created by graphic design studio Mucho, is a visual articulation of the hotel’s free-spirited attitude and the coexistence of disparate personalities and styles. Where the hotel’s interior features classical masonry, period furnishings and darker hues alongside areas of modern restraint, utility and light, Mucho’s brand identity is colourful, eccentric and playful. This reaches across coasters, packaging and a variety of other printed materials.

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John Lewis Childrenswear by Charlie Smith Design, UK

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brand identity and tags for John Lewis Childrenswear Department by Charlie Smith Design, London, UK

London-based studio Charlie Smith Design worked with British department store John Lewis to develop the visual identity system and packaging for their childrenswear department. The system needed to appeal to girls and boys aged from 2 to 14 (and presumably their parents), and connect a broad range of accessories and garments that included denim, swimwear, shoes and underwear.

The result is as a contemporary and playful typographic treatment across tags that use arrangement to call out gender, colour to identify different sizes, and materiality to establish a useful communicative contrast yet visual continuity throughout.

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