BPO


The Factory by Ghost, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

The Factory is an Oklahoma based fashion retailer, inspired by the energy and attitude of the people of Manhattan, Los Angeles and Tokyo, that mixes streetware with high fashion garments, shoes and accessories. Think ripped jeans, vintage purse and Louboutins. American graphic design studio Ghost worked with The Factory to develop a brand identity concept, which went on to include logotype and logo applied to business cards, tags, packaging and signage, underpinned by the concept of the store and compliments its interior design.

The Factory, Oklahoma

The low hanging lighting rigs, pulleys and suspended clothes racks, spot lights and steel framework, conveyer belt, exposed wires, DJ booth, polished stone floor, large windows, display surfaces with castors, white walls and black furniture fuse catwalk glamour with an industrial and urban utility. It is not unfamiliar and in some ways a touch retro, however, the distance between the permanent structure of the building and its retrofitting, which is emphasised through colour, is interesting, well done and delivers a temporary fashion show quality.

Logotype for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Ghost’s brand identity treatment is straightforward–an appropriate acknowledgement of contextual detail–with a consistency built around the geometric sans-serif characters of Brandon Grotesque and the mechanical qualities of Courier. It effectively leverages contrast through colour palette, typographical weight, size and style, reduction and flourish bound by a clear concept, and includes a few neat touches that break up the repetition of the logotype. These include the perceived luxury of gold edge painted detail, the quality of dyed black and uncoated boards with a white ink print finish, black safety pins and gold hole reinforcements, a symbol that exists somewhere between a flag and an F that is also used as a pattern to add texture, die cut tags and large white neon sign set across a black wall, a particular highlight.

Logotype and neon signage for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

The approach comfortably brings together a robust industrial quality, a luxury component, and a couple of fashion conventions distributed through colour, type, form and finish, and compliments interior detail by favouring consistency and the absence of overt expression yet conveys the the concept of the store in a reductive and specific manner outside of the retail experience. More from Ghost on BP&O.

Design: Ghost. Opinion: Richard Baird. Fonts Used: Courier & Brandon Grotesque

Business cards with gold detail for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Business cards with gold detail for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Bags and branded tissue paper for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

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Clothing tags for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Branded string pull bags for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Print for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Branded boxes for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Branded tissue paper for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Branding for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

Branding for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

What do you think of Ghost’s work for The Factory? Share your thoughts in the comment section below or get the conversation started on Twitter.

Signage for Oklahoma City fashion store The Factory graphic design studio Ghost

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  • Barry Wylie

    With the business cards…how have they got gold right to the edge? usually if you do layered cards you would still see black etc?

    Would they have stacked them together and screen printed the edges? Looks really good!

  • Butchy Butch

    Unfortuately, it looks like really bland hipster stock identity, seen before over and over again.

    • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

      I understand what you’re writing, although you are perhaps laying it on a bit thick, however, it’s worth trying to contextualise these assets and the communicative intention that underpins each design choice.

      When I write about work like this, when store experience and product is a big part of identity, I consider how brand identity works in conjunction with, in this instance, the bright colours and textures of the garments, how it compliments interior, and how it conveys concept. In that sense, while it is made up of few details, and understand your use of the word bland (the way these are shot doesn’t help), as a whole, I believe it is well-balanced.

      I tend not to concern myself with the perception of saturation (I write “perception” because blogs make the world look smaller), just whether something is relevant and memorable (in conjunction with experience and product).

      Context is perhaps one of the most important considerations when commenting on identity, unfortunately, the blog format makes this a little harder to do, but it’s worth trying to get a handle on product and environment, weighing up whether identity is about big personality or a tool to frame/link the more expressive, interesting and memorable qualities of product and experience.

      • Butchy Butch

        English isn’t my first language so I probably won’t be able to elaborate as precise as I’d like to, but… as much much as value your opinion, Richard, this time I desagree.

        I was trying to contextualise. And it still doesn’t work for me. I mean it works, but it is bland. Even the store itself. I understand what you’re saing about context, but I’m pretty sure they could emphasize it using variety of other means than using brandonlike font. This way it actually emphasize nothing more than making it trendy. Even if the trend itself is passing, and the treatment above in my opinion already looks outdated.

        In terms of design choices, I simply seem to miss the consistency here. The font, the flag icon just don’t work together. You can see that clearly on the business card. Front and back of the card look like pieces of two different identities. It takes a little more than that to make good minimal design.

        Looking at the logo, the treatment and the store itself I just feel like browsing through stock photography. It isn’t memorable or very good. Feels like easiest hipster choice.

      • Butchy Butch

        Logo on the busisness card isn’t well centered, and I won’t even try to uderstand the logo placement on the signboard over the entrance…
        Why on the paper logo is suddenly horizontal and THE underlined? Seriously some of it seem like weird, unnecessary and self indulgent choices in my opinion.

        • http://wwww.bpando.org/ Richard Baird

          My apologies about the late reply, you caught me just as I was leaving for a short holiday.

          Your English is very clear and appreciate the time you’ve taken to be specific in your criticism, some of which I would agree. However, I try to avoid being finickety when it comes to reviews on the site, and consider the impression it casts on those interacting with the brand and who aren’t identity designers distracted by minutiae. Context and customers as you might say.

          While I still disagree with your overall sentiments (where you see an unresolved disparity I see intentional contrast, where you see bland/trend/hipster I see a fair use of convention) I’m pleased to have another opinion on the site.