BPO


Erik Berglin: The Bird Project by Lundgren+Lindqvist

Text by Richard Baird.

Book Design Inspiration – Erik Berglin: The Bird Project by Lundgren+Lindqvist, Sweden

Erik Berglin is Stockholm-based contemporary artist. His work is flows from his understanding that some people find the art gallery uninviting and uncomfortable, and the artworks displayed as requiring insight to really appreciate. He himself has said that he dislikes 90% of the exhibitions he visits but adores the 10%. This clearly informs his work, which often brings the unexpected into the urban space or uses modern technologies to subvert the familiar. There is a beauty and playfulness to his work, an appealing aesthetic, but also an idea, an aha moment, for those that want to look deeper.

Beauty and the unexpected are central to Berglin’s The Bird Project. Over the last twelve years, having studied birds from antique books by the likes of J.J Audubon, the artist scanned pages from ornithology resources found in antiquarian bookshops and libraries and printed birds out at their actual size. He spent time with a scalpel and scissors carefully cutting these out and then wheat-pasted them in urban contexts around the world, documenting these as he went. From start to finish, a total of 4982 birds were wheat-pasted in twelve cities over five continents. These have been brought together in a new book, ‘The Bird Project 2006-2017’ designed by Lundgren+Lindqvist and published by ll’Editions. This is a 208 page hard back book 207×280mm in size. It features 101 plates printed using a process that substituted regular CMYK colours of the offset printing process with fluorescent alternatives. The book is also available as a special edition of 30 copies, which were divided into three sets of ten books. Each is presented in fluorescent acrylic glass slipcase with an inkjet print, signed and numbered by the artist.

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Maria Sole Ferragamo by Lundgren+Lindqvist

Opinion by Richard Baird

New logotype and visual identity by Swedish design studio Lundgren+Lindqvist for fashion designer Maria Sole Ferragam

Maria Sole Ferragamo is one-of-a-kind jewellery designer using up-cycled premium leather; remnants of the Italian fashion industry. She has a degree in architecture at Politecnico, Milan and another in jewellery design from Central Saint Martins, London. This intersection of fashion and architecture can be seen throughout the designer’s collection and has gone on to inform the design of her visual identity by Lundgren+Lindqvist. This is made up of a flexible logotype which comes in a compact form, split up on two lines, and a horizontally oriented version. For the former, a series of secondary level logotypes were designed, incorporating ‘So-Le Studio’ and ‘Florence/Firenze’ as well as additional secondary level information. The logotypes are woven together into a visual tapestry of type, running over and along the edges of boxes, and intersecting or framing images online.

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Next To The Ocean by Lundgren+Lindqvist

Opinion by Richard Baird

Catalogue cover and graphic identity for Next To The Ocean by Lundgren+Lindqvist

Valand Academy in Sweden offers a complete range of undergraduate, postgraduate and artistic research opportunities. This is a unique educational environment, the only one of its kind in Sweden. Next to the Ocean is an exhibition of works created by 23 of the students from the BFA, MFA and research programmes, which was held at Röda Sten Konsthall in Gothenburg.

The exhibition serves two purposes. The micro; a look at the individual interests and concerns of those on Valand Academy’s photography programme, and the meta; an intention to position this a representation and overview of what is happening in young contemporary photography in Sweden today. To express this proposition The Valand Academy approached Scandinavian design studio Lundgren+Lindqvist to develop the visual identity and catalogue for the exhibition. This is characterised by an immediacy of form language and a material appeal, and a conceptual subtlety in the relationship and direction of essay and image.

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