BPO


LogoArchive – Akogare 憧れ by Hugh Miller

LogoArchive Zine Akogare is special bi-ligual Extra Issue designed by Hugh Miller and dedicated to Japanese logo design

LogoArchive returns with its fourth collaborative Extra Issue and first bi-lingual release, documenting the forms of Japanese logo design. Through the distinctive smaller format of the bound booklet LogoArchive seeks to surprise and delight with each new issue, introducing new collaborators to offer unexpected interpretations of the ubiquitous logo book. For this Extra Issue, Hugh Miller orchestrates graphic impact and material nuance to honour the unique visual legacy and craft associated with Japan. In addition, the words of Tokyo-based designer and writer Ian Lynam, and his assistant Iori Kikuchi, offer an introduction into Japanese symbols.

LogoArchive の第4号目となる増刊号で は、日本のロゴデザインの形を記録し た 初 の バ イ リ ン ガ ル 版 を 発 行 し ま す 。小 冊子という独特のフォーマットを通し て、LogoArchive は毎号、新しいコラボレ ーターと共に、お馴染みのロゴブックへ の思い掛けない解釈を提案しながら、驚 きと喜びを追求しています。

今号では、Hugh Miller (ヒュー・ミラー) が、グラフィックのインパクトと素材のニ ュアンスの交差点を探り、日本にまつわ るユニークな視覚的遺産と工芸品を称 えています。さらに、東京を拠点に活動す るデザイナーであり作家でもあるイエン・ ライナムと、彼のアシスタントである菊地 伊織の言葉で、日本のシンボルを紹介し ています。

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OMA NY Monograph by Studio Lin

Text by Richard Baird

Monograph designed by Studio Lin for OMA New York, a celebration of over ten years work

The Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) is an international architectural practice operating within the traditional boundaries of architecture and urbanism. It was founded in 1975 in Rotterdam by architects Rem Koolhaas and Elia Zenghelis and alongside Madelon Vriesendorp and Zoe Zenghelis. OMA now has seven offices. This year saw the launch of OMA New York’s self-published monograph, designed by Studio Lin, that takes a look back at over 10 years of their work.

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Freigeist Zine Issue 3

Freigeist Zine Issue 3 designed by Richard Baird, published by BP&O

Freigeist was a popular concept within 18th Century German literature and journalism. It was used to describe those who believed that thinking should not be constrained by certain fundamental and non-contestable values, traditional ideas and established channels of distribution. The concept of the “free-spirit” and of free-thinking is also a recurring theme within Nietzsche’s own philosophy. Although, at first glance, the Freigeist concept may appear as lacking complexity, Nietzsche found a philosophical significance within it. To him, it was more than an invocation towards individuality and the subversion of expectation but the search for and liberation of a spirit. In this third issue of Freigeist, conceptualised, designed and edited by Richard Baird and published by BP&O, the search for that spirit continues in the form of a lecture-turned-zine. This lecture was delivered to the Falmouth MA Graphic Design program in 2020.

Freigeist and LogoArchive Zines are available to order from LogoArchive.Shop.

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