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Gustav Almestål by Bedow, Sweden

Opinion by Richard Baird

Brand identity and business card designed by Bedow for Swedish still life and food photographer Gustav Almestål

Gustav Almestål is a Swedish still life photographer who has built an extensive, high-profile and international client list that includes the likes of Electrolux, Wall Street Journal and Hermes. He now works from Stockholm, following several years in London, on projects that range from advertising and editorial to food and interiors.

The design of Gustav Almestål’s visual identity, which rested in the hands of Swedish design studio Bedow, touches upon his personal and innovative approach, use of light and shadow, and his frequent reference to enduring still life themes and historical art. These are expressed through a distinctive and individual monogram, its sculptural and dimensional qualities, an unusual multi-coloured block foil, the chiseled serifs of Portrait and the broad monospacing of sans-serif Heimat Mono.

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Sakki by Bond, Finland

Opinion by Richard Baird

Logotype, business cards, icons and mobile-first experience by Bond for Sakki, Finland's national union of vocational students

Sakki is Finland’s national union of vocational students. It is made up of 15-20 year olds from a variety of nations, and offers support, tackles student issues, and engages in activism. Scandinavian graphic design studio Bond worked with the union to design and develop a mobile-first experience, and a visual identity made up of tilt-responsive iconography, a bright, simple and modern colour palette and quirky logotype.

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Kisumé by Fabio Ongarato Design, Australia

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Visual identity and menus designed by Fabio Ongarato Design for Japanese restaurant in Melbourne Kisumé

Kisumé is a Japanese restaurant located on Melbourne’s Flinders Lane. It is described by Fabio Ongarato Design, the studio behind its visual identity, as an unconventional, slightly twisted and artfully executed experience. The restaurant intends to immerse guests in an intriguing view of Japanese traditions, and fuses these with the owner’s obsession with beauty and sensuality. This is expressed by a “brutally sophisticated and minimal interior design” created by Wood Marsh Architecture which features curated artworks by Japanese photographer Nobuyoshi Araki as well as Polly Borland, and in the break from the conventions of a typical Japanese dining experience in the movement and colour of visual identity. This links business cards, stationery, menus, window and lighting decals, posters and website.

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