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Tenderloin Museum by Mucho, United States

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Brand identity, t-shirts and tote bags for Tenderloin Museum by graphic design studio Mucho

The Tenderloin Museum tells the story of, and celebrates, the people and rich history of the Tenderloin district, a 31 block region of San Francisco. The museum’s permanent exhibition covers the area’s rebuilding, from 1906, following the great earthquake, until the present, and captures its diversity. It is a neighbourhood that has been filled with, what Mucho, the graphic design studio behind the museum’s visual identity describe rather romantically as, immigrants and iconoclasts, artists and activists, sinners and saints. It is a place known for “girls, gambling and graft” but equally for its cultural icons, these have included the Grateful Dead, Miles Davis and Dashiell Hammett.

Mucho were responsible for creating the museum’s brand identity, signage and merchandise, which extended to t-shirts, coasters, cups, mugs, maps, tote bags and posters.

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Bronuts by One Plus One Design, Canada

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Branding for Bronuts by Canadian graphic design studio One Plus One

Bronuts sells handmade donuts and freshly brewed coffee to the local community of the Exchange District in Winnipeg, Canada, and, as the name suggests, is run by two brothers. Bronuts’ location draws a variety of customers, from young professionals and corporate offices to college students. It has a warm interior of light wood, white tiles, exposed architectural surfaces and low-hanging bulbs.

Much like its interior, Bronuts’ brand identity, created by graphic design studio One Plus One Design and which including stationery, packaging and signage, comfortably sits between hipness and accessibility, and is thoroughly current. This is reflected within the geometric sans-serif characters of the logotype, the simple, playful and communicatively clear donut and coffee cup iconography, the cleverness of a logo with a glaze that doubles as a smile, doughnut patterns and the straightforward application of these assets across interior and packaging. This also extends to a limited colour palette and the uncoated and debossed surface and three-ply weight of a letterpress business card.

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