BPO


BP&O Collections — Klim Fonts

Selected by Richard Baird & Klim

A continually updated collection of brand identity and packaging design projects that feature fonts created by New Zealand’s The Klim Type Foundry. Klim creates both custom fonts for clients and retail fonts for designers, and is a firm favourite of BP&O. The foundry’s fonts frequently feature on the site, with DomaineFounders Grotesk and Calibre being regulars. These, as with all of Klim’s fonts, stand out for the quality of their build, historical context and character, and blend a modern usefulness and technical rigour with an evident workmanship.

This post was kindly sponsored by Klim, who will also be sponsoring BP&O’s weekly newsletter. Please do take a second to have a look through Klim’s catalogue, and spend some time reading through the origins, inspirations and design of each of their fonts. These are insightful and well-written, and add a real value to the Klim site. BP&O regularly revisits these prior to writing up reviews. Check out more at BP&O – Collections or subscribe to the series here.

 

Capt by Bunch, United Kingdom

Klim Font: Founders Grotesk

 

Klim Fonts – Founders Grotesk. Design – Capt by Bunch, United Kingdom

 

Taco Republic by Bielke & Yang, Norway

Klim Font: Domaine Display

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Display. Design – Taco Republic by Bielke & Yang, Norway

 

7-Eleven Sandwiches, Wraps and Salads by BVD

Klim Font: Calibre

 

Klim Fonts – Calibre. Design – 7-Eleven Sandwiches, Wraps and Salads by BVD

 

Urbanna by Forma & Co, Spain

Klim Font: Domaine Text

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Text. Design – Urbanna by Forma & Co, Spain

 

Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra by Bond, Finland

Klim Font: Founders Grotesk

 

Klim Fonts – Founders Grotesk. Design – Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra by Bond, Finland

 

Johnny Roxburgh by Bunch, United Kingdom

Klim Font: Domaine Display

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Display. Design – Johnny Roxburgh by Bunch, United Kingdom

 

Endgame: Duchamp, Chess, and the Avant-Garde by Hey, Spain

Klim Font: Founders Grotesk

 

Klim Fonts – Founders Grotesk. Design – Endgame: Duchamp, Chess, and the Avant-Garde by Hey, Spain

 

Common Lot by Perky Bros, United States

Klim Font: Feijoa & National

 

Klim Fonts – Feijoa & National. Design – Common Lot by Perky Bros, United States

 

Sant Jordi Festival 2017 by Requena & Capdevila, Spain

Klim Font: Domaine Text

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Text. Design – Sant Jordi Festival 2017 by Requena & Capdevila, Spain

 

Bedroc by Perky Bros, United States

Klim Font: Founders Grotesk Condensed

 

Klim Fonts – Founders Grotesk Condensed. Design – Bedroc by Perky Bros, United States

 

Alquimie by Thought Assembly, United Kingdom

Klim Font: Domaine Display

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Display. Design – Alquimie by Thought Assembly, United Kingdom

 

Taidehalli by Tsto, Finland

Klim Font: Calibre

 

Klim Fonts – Calibre. Design – Taidehalli by Tsto, Finland

 

Huckle & Goose by Cast Iron, United States

Klim Font: Domaine Text

 

Klim Fonts – Domain Text. Design – Huckle & Goose by Cast Iron, United States

 

Fab Media by Bedow, Sweden

Klim Font: Domaine Sans

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Sans. Design – Fab Media by Bedow, Sweden

 

In Search of the Present by Werklig, Finland

Klim Font: Domaine Text

 

Klim Fonts – Domaine Text. Design – In Search of the Present by Werklig, Finland

 

Room Essentials by Collins, United States

Klim Font: Founders Grotesk

 

Klim Fonts – Founders Grotesk. Design – Room Essentials by Collins, United States

 

This post was published as a quick way to browse through BP&O’s content and gain access to older but equally interesting projects through different themes, and expands upon previous posts under the category BP&O Collections. If you liked this, subscribe to the series here.


  • Larry Nguyen

    Love this collection! The usage of type to distinguish and represent core values is so elegant, subtle and nuanced.

    Was wondering from everyone:
    1) How do you get buy-in from clients to base a visual identity primarily on a type choice and not custom elements?
    2) Also, how do you convince them to spend $1800 USD on a typeface like Founder’s Grotesk?

    These two points always feel so mysterious to me…

    • Great questions. Hopefully we can get a few different responses. For me, a freelance designer working with sole traders and small business:

      1) underpinning type choice with an appropriate concept (either a big singular idea, or a confluence of smaller but interrelated ideas) & implementation (typesetting, type as pattern, as a a mode for compelling copy, set over interesting papers or structures, used in conjunction with appropriate inks and finishes).

      I think, if you’re looking for clarity and simplicity, with type as a primary and dominant component, there really needs to be a discernible concept at play.

      2) I tend to start clients off with individual weights until they feel comfortable, and build outwards. It’s more expensive in the long run but an easier sell for small businesses.

      • Larry Nguyen

        Thank you Richard! This is exactly the kind of insight I was hoping to hear, especially when working primarily with small to medium enterprises as well. Cheers!

    • PaddyC

      I have licensed a number Klim fonts and cannot recommend them enough. Kris Sowersby is a remarkable type designer.

      Larry, to answer your second question, for smaller projects/clients I will assess the client and project and always put money into the budget to account for a new font license purchase. As Richard mentioned, I will then purchase single weights as needed to develop the initial concepts. Once I have a decision and sign off I can go ahead an either purchase the entire family or a few additional weights.

      Keep in mind that with most foundries you will receive credit against the purchase of a full family license for the individual weights you have already purchased.

      You mentioned $1,800 US for Founders. I’m not sure where that number came from. The complete family is $900. But that is for a very large family and one most clients would not need. The core Founders family is $300 US. As mentioned, when I look at a branding project, working $500-$1,000 (again, depending very much on the client) into the budget for this process is not a problem in the context of the overall cost.

      • Larry Nguyen

        Thanks Paddy! That makes a lot of sense. We’ve actually in the past itemized everything to kind of avoid sticker shock from the client – but perhaps, at a certain threshold of pricing, it seems costing in fonts are negligible.

        Just realized the $1800 was for a license for “up to 8 computers”! That explains the $1800 usd….

        Thank you again for the insight!

      • AlbertSPDA

        I take the same approach as PaddyC. It depends on the size of the project but I will almost always allocate funds for a new typeface purchase. For a larger client with a reasonable budget, the cost is negligible and the value far supersedes the fee. For smaller clients, I have often times covered a percentage of that cost because a specific typeface was a perfect fit. A unique, well chosen typeface is crucial to developing a new brand and clients appreciate that. They also appreciate your insight and the detail you put into something they may not have understood to be important.