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Teatulia by Here Design

Opinion by Richard Baird

Graphic identity including logo design, print, packaging and window decals by Here Design for single origin tea brand Teatulia

Teatulia is a Bangladeshi single origin tea brand that recently moved into the UK market, opening a flagship store, tea shop and cocktail bar in London’s Covent Garden. It is a social enterprise creating jobs in a remote region of Bangladesh and has, so far, transformed 3,000 acres of barren land into an organic tea garden. Drawing on Teatulia’s single-source positioning—common for coffee but unusual for the tea market—Here Design developed a graphic identity that, through colour and form, and inspired by the work of renowned Indian filmmaker and graphic designer Satyajit Ray, is infused with Bangladeshi culture. This intersects an elegant interior design of warmth and texture by way of packaging and window decals.

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Anton&Anton Kioski by Bond

Opinion by Richard Baird

New visual identity and packaging design by Bond for Finnish supermarket and delivery service Anton&Anton Kiosk

Anton&Anton (A&A) is an alternative to and antithesis of the large supermarket chains. Staff are described as relaxed, smiley and proud. Their ranges (mostly) organic, some homecooked and also available online for home delivery. With a desire to express an approachable, playful yet credible positioning, and a need to develop a cohesive set of packaging and communications assets A&A worked with Bond to create a new visual identity. This is characterised by an intersection of an elegant wordmark, simple shapes, multi-colour and distinctive structural designs that also move into a retail space designed by Futu Design. Alongside wordmark, iconography and packaging, Bond also designed signage, tote bags, aprons and sweatshirts.

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246 Queen by Studio South

Opinion by Richard Baird

Graphic identity by Studio South for 246 Queen, a retail, hospitality and business development within a mid-century modernist building in Auckland

246 Queen has a long and storied history. Opened in 1964 on Auckland’s Queen Street, it heralded a new era of modern architectural vision, exclusive boutique-based experience and an urban post-war retail sophistication. The building played host to fashion shows, designer concessions, furniture showrooms and contemporary dining. However, the architectural ideas drawn up by the original architects Rigby Mullan (Alan Rigby and Antony Mallen), remained only partially realised. These are now being paid homage to in the building’s renovation by the Wilshire Group working in collaboration with architects Fearon Hay, once again becoming a mixed-use space of food and drink, retail and commercial opportunities across eight floors.

Architectural details include a distinctive fascia of curved windows and accents, floor to ceiling central glass light well, exposed ceiling and concrete floors. This sits within a district of 20th-century architecture and mid-century landmarks, a broad range of coffee shops and casual dining, the Auckland Art Gallery and the century-old Albert Park.

The marketing of the building and its spaces is aimed at what are described as design-savvy directors. Those with companies within the creative sectors, smart PR, marketing, bespoke legal and financial services, those who have developed award-winning digital experiences or are tech innovators. Essentially, those with clients who expect the structure and space to fit the nature of the companies they intend to work with. In this way, modernist architecture functions as a material symbol of the pioneering spirit that now exists within the less material worlds of the service led and digital sectors.

The marketing language and the graphic identity of the building, designed by Auckland-based Studio South, draws on the history and original vision of the building. This revolves around the modernist, and aimed at those that recognise or are drawn in by mid-century architectural heritage and an associated graphic history, and desire access to contemporary international food and high-quality services in building and locally. This manifests itself through type and text, colour, material and structure, and through a graphic motif that is inspired by the building’s curved accents and large rounded windows.

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