BPO


LogoArchive #2 by BP&O (Preview)

The first issue of LogoArchive in print was conceived, designed and sent to the printers (for quotation) within a day. It was inspired by a panel discussion that took place the day before at Somerset House as part of the exhibition Print! Tearing It Up. Following a successful launch and a sold-out first release, LogoArchive returns with Issue 2, which begins to reconfigure itself.

LogoArchive is founded on an enthusiasm for a well-crafted logo; a convivial metaphor, a communicative immediacy and smart use of form language. However, in print, it was never conceived as a document with a singular intention; the simple documentation of logos, rather a delivery mode in which to build a story and share thoughts. A conversation on Twitter; digital dialogue lost in the passage of time but forever coded into the electronic aether, is materialised as ink on paper and written into the story and ongoing development of the zine. This sits alongside an anthropological text; a musing on the distinctive qualities of the human eye.

LogoArchive Issue 2 is a compact 16 pages printed by WithPrint on Colorplan Ebony 175gsm with a white ink. It also features a Colorplan Candy Pink 175gsm insert printed with black, bound with black staples. It is a small second step but has ambitions to grow into a compelling and accessible series.

An early release of LogoArchive #2 is available online from counter-print.co.uk from the 28/4, and then in-store and online at magCulture, MagmaBooks and Present & Correct in London, Standards Manual in New York, Beautiful Pages in Sydney and Lorem (not Ipsum) in Zurich. Issue 1 will have a limited re-issue available at the same time as the launch of Issue 1 and will be available exclusively at counter-print.co.uk.

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OfficeUS Manual by Pentagram

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Book designed by Pentagram's Natasha Jen for OfficeUS Manual published by Lars Müller Publishers

OfficeUS Manual is a guide to the American architectural workplace over the past century. It is the third book in the OfficeUS series which deals with the development of international US architectural practices, and offers insight into the office life of these over the past 100 years; how they have changed and remained the same. It does this through the compiling and presentation of job listings, timesheets and estimates, work furniture and reception areas, office hours and benefits.

The book is marked by its approach; a balance of criticality, conviviality and deadpan documentation, in its mix of isolated objects, technical drawings and iconography, contemporary reflections by more than fifty architects, artists and writers, and a scope that covers the meta, macro and micro.

The book was edited by Eva Franch, Ana Miljački, Carlos Mínguez Carrasco, Jacob Reidel and Ashley Schafer and published by Lars Müller Publishers. It is a paperback measuring 160 × 240mm, made up of 288 pages featuring 461 illustrations and was designed by Pentagram partner Natasha Jen and team.

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Dissabtes MACBA by Hey

Opinion by Richard Baird.

Logo, posters, flyers and banners designed by Hey for Dissabtes MACBA, a free Saturday's event at MACBA and a collaboration with UNIQLO

Dissabtes MACBA (“MACBA’s Saturdays”) is a partnership between The Museum of Contemporary Art of Barcelona (MACBA); an iconic architectural symbol and one of the city’s leading cultural institutions, and the Japanese fashion retailer UNIQLO who recently arrived in Barcelona, and due to open its second store this year.

The Dissabtes MACBA initiative offers free entry to the museum every Saturday evening, 4–8pm, and invites visitors to participate in a wide range of differential events and activities that will include workshops, concerts and performances, as well as an opportunity to meet some of the artists who have work on display. To mark the initiative, collaborative spirit, and serving to bring the UNIQLO brand into the local consciousness, Barcelona-based studio Hey was commissioned to create a campaign that represented the close relationship between MACBA and UNIQLO within the city’s centre. This is expressed through both form and colour language, in a striking and singular gesture, elevated by its repetition across a variety of different communicative modes and formats that included postersbanners, bus ads and digital screens throughout the museum.

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