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LogoArchive Issue 5

The technical limitations of the mid-century—the need for a steady hand and a precise mind for mechanical reproduction—demanded that an exceptional level of care and creativity be given over to shape and space, association and perception. These considerations created a rich corporate and consumer form language and range of graphic techniques. These have been partly marginalised, usurped by modern print and display technologies. They do remain as useful reference points in which to help create an effective symbol today, one that works well in a black or white, can be used with vibrant inks, seductive materials and eye-catching finishes as well as being displayed in motion on ever more diverse screens types. With this in mind, LogoArchive returns with an issue dedicated to some of the techniques of mid-century symbol-making. Visit our shop here.

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LogoArchive Issue 5 by BP&O (Preview)

LogoArchive returns with Issue 5 – Technique. The technical limitations of the mid-century—the need for a steady hand and a precise mind for mechanical reproduction—demanded that an exceptional level of care and creativity be given over to shape and space, association and perception. These considerations created a rich corporate and consumer form language and range of graphic techniques. These have been partly marginalised, usurped by modern print and display technologies. They do remain as useful reference points in which to help create an effective symbol today, one that works well in a black or white, can be used with vibrant inks, seductive materials and eye-catching finishes as well as being displayed in motion on ever more diverse screens types.

LogoArchive Issue 5 focuses on eleven simple techniques, naming them, exemplifying them and offering short commentaries. It serves as an archival and pedagogical document, offering an alternative take on the ubiquitous logo tips article. In this way it looks at things another way around. This alternate viewpoint manifests itself materially in the dual modes of reading the zine, either portrait and symbol first, or landscape text first. By presenting these texts in a landscape format, the zine encourages its readers to embrace the full materiality of what began as a digital Instagram project, and view the symbols documented in different ways, to see how their form language is diminished or enhanced.

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We Compost by Seachange

Opinion by Richard Baird

Logo, visual identity and business cards designed by Seachange for leading commercial compostable waste collection service We Compost

When organic waste breaks down in landfill, methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is released. This has been identified as a significant contributor to climate change. Through composting, this organic waste can be repurposed as a soil nutrient which can then play a role in developing local and sustainable methods of regional food production. The challenge of turning this into a consistent resource comes down to good waste management, both on the part of households and collection services. Few of the latter exist, however, in Auckland, We Compost intends to make this a widespread reality. Collecting over 40,000 kg of organic waste and diverting it from going to landfill each week We Compost has grown over the last seven years to become the city’s leading commercial compostable waste collection service.

With a desire to continue this growth, We Compost worked with design studio Seachange to help with brand positioning and visual identity, to better align it with their ambitions, make it an every household mainstay and to move it beyond those already invested in ecological challenges and solutions. To achieve this, Seachange’s strategy sought to find a fresh graphic approach to compostable waste management and collection, to find a fun, modern and accessible route that would be an invitation to all ages and types of households to get involved. The studio achieved this by way of a custom typeface that draws on the crucial role worms play in the process of composting, and pairs this with a variety of greens. A range of patterns and statements deliver a convivial and recognisable immediacy across differing of contexts, these included bin liners, t-shirts, business cards, posters and website.

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