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The Best of BP&O — October 2018

Selected by Richard Baird.

The Best Graphic Design — October 2018

October’s highlights included property identities for 246 Queen and The Maitland by Studio South and Studio Brave, respectively. There were, however, five projects that stood out and have made it into BP&O’s Best Of Series. Between them these typically balance a strong singular concept or an appropriate confluence of ideas with a compelling visual character and clear communicative intention that appropriately play with form, colour, type and layout, as well as material, texture, image and print finish.

BP&O, in this end of month review, tries to recognise both the smart use of small budgets—those that channel spending into the most appropriate assets—and those projects with a broad and holistic quality, establishing a continuity (conceptual and/or visual) across multiple touch points. Many of the projects share a concise aesthetic expression, yet there is nuance and strategic weight to these, so do click through and read more about each of these.

Throughout the month BP&O also continued to expand on its collections series as another way to jump through to older posts on the site. This included a collection of projects that feature banner design.

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LogoArchive Issue 3 by BP&O (Preview)

The first issue of LogoArchive in print was conceived, designed and sent to the printers (for quotation) within a day. It was inspired by a panel discussion that took place the day before at Somerset House as part of the exhibition Print! Tearing It Up. Following a successful launch and a sold-out first issue LogoArchive returns in November with its third release.

LogoArchive is founded on a long-standing enthusiasm for a well-crafted mid-century logo; a convivial metaphor, a communicative immediacy and smart use of form language. However, in print, it was never imagined as a document with just a singular intention; the simple documentation of logos, rather a mode in which to build a story and migrate ideas. This project also intends to explore the potential of the zine to reconfigure itself regularly over time. Issue 3 tackles this theme more directly through the collation of found science symbols, three original texts and the recycled materiality of an insert. The passage of time is marked by each new issue through volume, with a further page added, taking the zine up to twenty pages, this includes front and back as a critical part of content and total experience.

LogoArchive Issue 3 will be printed by WithPrint on Colorplan Ebony 175gsm with multiple passes of white ink on an HP Indigo press. It features an eight-page Cyclus 100gsm insert printed with black. These are bound with black staples. As the zine moves into its third issue, it begins to find its feet, moving closer towards its ambition of sharing ideas and the joy of mid-century symbols. An early release of LogoArchive Issue 3 will be available online from counter-print.co.uk at the beginning of November. Sign up for release notifications here.

The few remaining copies of Issue 2 are available in the US from Standards Manual and in Europe through Lorem (not Impum).


New Architecture in South Tyrol 2012—2018 by Studio Mut

Opinion by Richard Baird

Book design and layout by Studio Mut for New Architecture in South Tyrol

New Architecture in South Tyrol—a travelling exhibition and catalogue—brings to light the unique architectural boom happening in Alto Adige, also known as South Tyrol, the predominantly German-speaking northern-most province of Italy.

Selected by an international jury, the catalogue focuses on fifty-nine buildings from the region, realised between 2012–2018, and have gained local contemporary architects international recognition. These buildings are marked by their keen sense of locality and materialisation. This is documented throughout the exhibition catalogue by way of images and plans. Texts in English, German and Italian augment these, providing a comprehensive survey of recent architectural trends and developments in the region with the intention of facilitating international comparison.

The design of the exhibition catalogue, developed by Studio Mut, channels the architectural continuities present within the region and draws these out through the immediacy of imagery and technical drawings, and explored playfully in the balance of type and space. In this, the design of the catalogue captures the “lively and innovative architectural scene” rooted in a rich tradition of craftsmanship, and set within, and often in contrast to, an alpine context.

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