BPO


BP&O Collections — Time

Selected by Richard Baird.

BP&O Collections — Time

A continually updated gallery of graphic identity design work, reviewed and published on BP&O, that features a distinctive temporal component. This could be the literal depiction of a clock face, static or animated, in the implication of the passage of time through cropped text, the bookending of time in the intersection of the visual languages of modernity and legacy, through a strong emphasis on chronological layout or the time-control exerted over a reader through generous letter and line spacing.

This post features work by Studio Hi Ho, Bedow and Pentagram, and covers a variety of projects, from exhibitions and gallery spaces to private dining experiences and property development. Highlights include the passage of time marked by DN&Co. using sequential posters that remove layers of detail over time. The critical relationship between time and light manifested photographically by Blok for Superkul, or implied materially by Triboro. And in the seasonality of imagery captured by Raw Color for furniture manufacture Arco.

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LogoArchive Extra Issue – Canada Modern

LogoArchive Extra Issue – Canada Modern. Designer / Editor Blair Thomson. Photo: Pip hyper Photography

The first issue of LogoArchive was conceived, designed and sent to the printers within a day. It was inspired by a panel discussion that took place the day before at Somerset House as part of the exhibition Print! Tearing It Up. Following the successful launch of three issues, LogoArchive returns with a very special Extra Issue in collaboration with Canada Modern, designed and edited by Blair Thomson, documenting the forms and colour of Canada’s modernist symbols. The LogoArchive Extra Issue – Canada Modern is available from counter-print.co.uk.

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The Golden Hour by Triboro

Opinion by Richard Baird

New Graphic Identity and matchboxes for The Golden Hour by Triboro

The Golden Hour is an outdoor seasonal restaurant located in New York’s The High Line Hotel. It is a place to experience the softening of sunlight with unobstructed views of the Chelsea skyline. The restaurant intends to draw to mind the casual elegance of a coastal soirée rather than the rushing of pre-dinner drinks. The restaurant space is described as being a lush outdoor dining room where brass tables meet tropical vegetation and aisles of topiary. Drinks are centred around the escapement of the summer heat which compliments dishes inspired by the flavours of late summer on the North Atlantic, created to be enjoyed outdoors. There is a theatre to the experience in its spatial considerations, performative aspect, in the transitions that happen over time within the restaurant (small plates to large platters), and the evocation of a time and place. This temporal quality also emerges in the design of The Golden Hour’s visual identity, in the intersection of the graphic and the material, in the use of abstract motif, shape and symbology by American design studio Triboro across menus, coasters, notecards, business cards and website.

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360ME, Montgomery+Evelyn by Studio Makgill

Opinion by Richard Baird

Packaging design by Studio Makgill for supplement company Montgomery+Evelyn's new range 360ME

360ME is the first range of “life-ready” “Mood Nutrition” from Montgomery+Evelyn a new nutritional supplement company. Each of the four products focus on an individual and singular benefit with each capsule providing exactly what the body needs without having to purchase multiple products. M+E intends to bring a new level of quality and clarity of communication to a complicated nutrition market.

Working with founder, Evie Montgomery, Studio Makgill developed positioning, brand values, product architecture and packaging design, with their strategy emerging from the clarity in Evie’s approach, a beautiful and simple intersection of clinical science and human experience. This was expressed through visual identity by way of visible grid, bright coloured dots and a neutral sans-serif.

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